Foods

Graham and I both like to eat, so we have developed some foraging and cooking skills. My parents are very open-minded and mom in particular is very adventurous and creative and encouraged us to try new things (just try it!)… but she wasn’t about to make a veggie option in additional to the meal she was cooking for the family when I decided at 12 that I didn’t want to eat meat. Graham is not a vegetarian, but he eats a TREMENDOUS amount to keep up with his activity level and crazy Hamilton-steel-furnace-metabolism. We are used to cooking vegetarian meals for ourselves, often with Indian, South-East Asian, and Latin American flavours. I think its fair to say that we both take an interest in food and cooking; we have a collection of cookbooks at home, I have a diploma in Applied Human Nutrition from SFU, and Graham has an honorary degree in eating awarded by Superstore.

One of the coolest things about traveling has been seeing and tasting the local specialties, and self-catering (or at least picnicking) along the way. We try to check out the outdoor markets and grocery stores whenever we can to see what grows there, what people buy, and what things cost. We have described some of the things we ate in the different countries, but there is a lot more so I thought it deserved its own post. We have a few pictures of markets, so I thought I’d post them and narrate. If you are not a food person then my apologies, we’ll be back to the vagaries of Swedish bureaucracy shortly.

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I know it seems nerdy to get excited about cabbage, but these were far and away the nicest cabbages I had ever seen; they are in the main market square in Prague.

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These berry baskets are also in Prague. If you look carefully at the top of the photo, you can see a vertical stick – this held a sign with a camera crossed out. No pictures! Unfortunately I didn’t see that until after the picture. Opps.

Pretzels are a pretty popular street food in Czech Republic and Poland.  This window in Prague is pretty nice, but most of them were just little hotdog-type carts.  In Poland, a fresh, salt-sprinkled pretzel will set you back 1.3 Zloty (about 50 cents Canadian).
Pretzels are a pretty popular street food in Czech Republic and Poland. This window in Prague is pretty nice, but most of them were just little hotdog-type carts. In Poland, a fresh, salt-sprinkled pretzel will set you back 1.3 Zloty (about 50 cents Canadian).

Cute neighbourhood grocery store between Krakow and Oświęcim, justr for Elizabeth.  Sorry for the crap quality.
Cute neighbourhood grocery store between Krakow and Oświęcim, just for Elizabeth. Sorry for the crap quality.

Me making my standard picture face at a paprika stand in the Great Market hall in Budapest.  Spicy!
Me making my standard picture face at a paprika stand in the Great Market hall in Budapest. Spicy!

Wide view of the great market square in Budapest.  It is like Granville Island Public Market, but bigger and more diverse.
Wide view of the great market square in Budapest. It is like Granville Island Public Market, but bigger and more diverse.

Sweets at an outdoor festival in Budapest.  I had one of the closer chocolate-covered ones – it was an express train to marzipan city.
Sweets at an outdoor festival in Budapest. I had one of the closer chocolate-covered ones – it was an express train to marzipan city.
This is a ‘LAngorm’, the street food that is most popular in Hungary.  It is like a beaver tail (deep-fried flat donut) but with garlic, cheese and sour cream.  We needed to balance out those healthy apples somehow.
This is a ‘lángos’, the street food that is most popular in Hungary. It is like a beaver tail (deep-fried flat donut) but with garlic, cheese and sour cream. We needed to balance out those healthy apples somehow.
I love Ovaltine, even though Graham says it tastes like dirt.  In Austria they had lots of Ovaltine products, including two kinds of chocolate bar, cold drink in a bottle to go, and Ovaltine granola.  Awesome!
I love Ovaltine, even though Graham says it tastes like dirt. In Austria they had lots of Ovaltine products, including two kinds of chocolate bar, cold drink in a bottle to go, and Ovaltine granola. Awesome!
We made some purchases here today in Gavle: half kg of Chantarelles for about CDN$4 and half-litre of fresh lingon berries for just under CDN$2.
We made some purchases here today in Gavle: half kg of Chantarelles for about CDN$4 and litre of fresh lingon berries for just under CDN$2.
This is my favourite fruit stand so far – this sign means ‘you’re welcome!’ so these are free apples from our new neighbours.  We have been enjoying them!  It is definitely apple season here, all the lawns are covered in them.
This is my favourite fruit stand so far – this sign means ‘you’re welcome!’ so these are free apples from our new neighbours. We have been enjoying them! It is definitely apple season here, all the lawns are covered in them.

2 thoughts on “Foods”

  1. oooooo! i think this is my fav posting so far… yum yum yum! i love the illegal berry photo.. stunning… i love that you can get a mixed berry bucket to sample all sorts of goodies for on the go snacking. yum. I also love the cabbage photo with graham… awww…

    those tarty looking welcome to eat me apples are speaking apple crumble to this foodie. mmmm

    ps. i hope you are planning on sending some of that delicious ovamaltine granola home… man oh man, wanty! why on earth is it not ultra popular in canada!?! wanty!

    love you. cute bloggy guys. xo

  2. cabbages, berries, and pretzels, oh my! This food post is wonderful, and i’m with BSN on the illegal berry photo. Tourists. The sweets table looks amazing. A friend of Kristina’s recently posted on facebook about her love of ovaltine. I was happy to tell her about ovaltine candy and chocolate bars. I think i may need to bring some back for her now. I’ve created a monster. mwaaahaaahaaaa…

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